Question 1

Domain 6. Core Counseling Attributes

Sub-Domain 6.A. Awareness of self and impact on clients

  • 1. To provide an atmosphere of trust, what intake information was presented to suggest the counselor needs to be aware of his impact on the client?
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Part One

Intake


Clint

Age:  12

Sex:  Male

Gender:  Male

Sexuality:  

Ethnicity:  Caucasian

Relationship Status:  Single

Counseling Setting:  Outpatient – community counseling office

Types of Counseling:  Individual and Family

Presenting Problem:  Aggressive, lack of remorse, impulsivity, anger, noncompliant

Diagnosis:  Conduct Disorder, childhood-onset type, callous-lack of empathy

  

Presenting Problem:

The client was accompanied by his mother to the counseling office after an incident surrounding a neighbor's complaint. She expressed frustrations and stated up front that she had lost control in how to raise her son. He needs a reality check in how to get along with people. He is unable to develop and maintain a prosocial relationship with his peers and is much like his father. The mother was hesitant in correcting the client when he did not express any type of greeting when meeting the counselor. He immediately took a seat directly in front of the therapist and took out his cell phone. She presented with a degree of helplessness and ineptness in managing and raising her son. The extenuating circumstances for this appointment was she believed he acted out again; this time driving their golf cart across a neighbor's front lawn and tearing up the sod. The neighbor called the police to report the incident and shortly thereafter the police appeared at the client's door. The client was present when the officer reported the disturbance and asked him if did the act. He denied doing so and blamed teenagers.

Mental Status:

The client is of average intelligence, communication was minimal and rather abrupt. His first statement to the interviewer was that he did not have answers for the policeman's insinuations. He added to this statement indicating his mother has all the answers. He appears to have a maturity gap which is likely to be a result of an extended period of dependence (unsubstantiated). When asked about his family, he said his father was often mean, harsh, and his mother seemed like she lacked warmth and was detached from his world. When his mother was sharing her observations about the purpose of the counseling appointment, he interrupted her with, "You don't know the facts, it was not like that and come on, you are making it worse than it really was." The mother appeared embarrassed and said, "That is how he is with everyone." When these interchanges took place, the interviewer asked the client to let his mother finish and it would be his turn to relate his thoughts. The client's reply was in a style of argumentative stance. He said, "If you are making the decisions, it is important that you know the facts." He presents with signs of a lack of inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and emotional dysregulation.

Family History:

The mother said there was turmoil in the family for most of the years before the divorce three years ago. Her son seemed to be affected more than she or his sister. He seemed to blame her for the divorce yet his father was mentally and physically mean to him. She feels responsible because she was not a good mother. When he was born she went through a bad time knowing she was not ready for a child. She is aware she was not there for him in the early years and did not model good parentification skills. She worked through that period and the bad times with her husband but dearly wants the best for her son, she does love him. The father was a distant person who had difficulty revealing his feelings other than irritability and a strong need for control. While married, she did not intervene in family discipline because her husband was the master of the house and belittled any efforts of hers to contribute. The divorce prompted her to find full-time employment. Both children were pretty much latch-key children because of her work responsibilities. She was reported to the county agency and visited by a social worker to respond to the charge of 'children unattended'. She was aware of her son's increasing social and maybe legal inappropriateness. When the golf cart incident was brought to her attention, her son did not admit to being responsible. When the officer left, she began to cry and raised her voice and said, "How could you?" The son turned his back and retreated to his room without a response. He has cut classes at school and things have been missing from the home. He will leave the house in the evening and often does not meet a set curfew. At times, when he has not met her curfew, she has not held him responsible for his actions. They have had arguments and shoving episodes although he has not hit her. He tussles and has gotten physical with his sister but nothing hurtful except for feelings. He likes to be the tough guy in the neighborhood which has ended in a couple of fist-fights. She cares about him and wants him on the right track.

Counselor deliberations prior to first session:

The primary symptoms to be managed and treated were addressed prior to and during the first session including: 1) counseling setting for individual, residential treatment facility, and/or hospitalization, parent training, parent/child training 2) primary symptoms to be addressed include callous-unemotional traits (CE), reciprocal relations, limited prosocial emotion (LPE), emotional dysfunction, emotional self-regulation, executive function (inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and working memory.) The counselor provided a definition and understanding for each symptom and specific psychosocial treatment. The treatment was to focus on emotions and self-management that cut across several of the symptoms. A counselor concern is to develop a working alliance since the client appears resistant to counseling and symptoms reflect a lack of trust.

Question 2

Domain 1. Professional Practice and Ethics

Sub-Domain 2.N. Use formal and informal observations

  • 2. The mental status indicated the client had a deficit for inhibitory control. What in the intake would support that symptom?
Next Question


Part One

Intake


Clint

Age:  12

Sex:  Male

Gender:  Male

Sexuality:  

Ethnicity:  Caucasian

Relationship Status:  Single

Counseling Setting:  Outpatient – community counseling office

Types of Counseling:  Individual and Family

Presenting Problem:  Aggressive, lack of remorse, impulsivity, anger, noncompliant

Diagnosis:  Conduct Disorder, childhood-onset type, callous-lack of empathy

  

Presenting Problem:

The client was accompanied by his mother to the counseling office after an incident surrounding a neighbor's complaint. She expressed frustrations and stated up front that she had lost control in how to raise her son. He needs a reality check in how to get along with people. He is unable to develop and maintain a prosocial relationship with his peers and is much like his father. The mother was hesitant in correcting the client when he did not express any type of greeting when meeting the counselor. He immediately took a seat directly in front of the therapist and took out his cell phone. She presented with a degree of helplessness and ineptness in managing and raising her son. The extenuating circumstances for this appointment was she believed he acted out again; this time driving their golf cart across a neighbor's front lawn and tearing up the sod. The neighbor called the police to report the incident and shortly thereafter the police appeared at the client's door. The client was present when the officer reported the disturbance and asked him if did the act. He denied doing so and blamed teenagers.

Mental Status:

The client is of average intelligence, communication was minimal and rather abrupt. His first statement to the interviewer was that he did not have answers for the policeman's insinuations. He added to this statement indicating his mother has all the answers. He appears to have a maturity gap which is likely to be a result of an extended period of dependence (unsubstantiated). When asked about his family, he said his father was often mean, harsh, and his mother seemed like she lacked warmth and was detached from his world. When his mother was sharing her observations about the purpose of the counseling appointment, he interrupted her with, "You don't know the facts, it was not like that and come on, you are making it worse than it really was." The mother appeared embarrassed and said, "That is how he is with everyone." When these interchanges took place, the interviewer asked the client to let his mother finish and it would be his turn to relate his thoughts. The client's reply was in a style of argumentative stance. He said, "If you are making the decisions, it is important that you know the facts." He presents with signs of a lack of inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and emotional dysregulation.

Family History:

The mother said there was turmoil in the family for most of the years before the divorce three years ago. Her son seemed to be affected more than she or his sister. He seemed to blame her for the divorce yet his father was mentally and physically mean to him. She feels responsible because she was not a good mother. When he was born she went through a bad time knowing she was not ready for a child. She is aware she was not there for him in the early years and did not model good parentification skills. She worked through that period and the bad times with her husband but dearly wants the best for her son, she does love him. The father was a distant person who had difficulty revealing his feelings other than irritability and a strong need for control. While married, she did not intervene in family discipline because her husband was the master of the house and belittled any efforts of hers to contribute. The divorce prompted her to find full-time employment. Both children were pretty much latch-key children because of her work responsibilities. She was reported to the county agency and visited by a social worker to respond to the charge of 'children unattended'. She was aware of her son's increasing social and maybe legal inappropriateness. When the golf cart incident was brought to her attention, her son did not admit to being responsible. When the officer left, she began to cry and raised her voice and said, "How could you?" The son turned his back and retreated to his room without a response. He has cut classes at school and things have been missing from the home. He will leave the house in the evening and often does not meet a set curfew. At times, when he has not met her curfew, she has not held him responsible for his actions. They have had arguments and shoving episodes although he has not hit her. He tussles and has gotten physical with his sister but nothing hurtful except for feelings. He likes to be the tough guy in the neighborhood which has ended in a couple of fist-fights. She cares about him and wants him on the right track.

Counselor deliberations prior to first session:

The primary symptoms to be managed and treated were addressed prior to and during the first session including: 1) counseling setting for individual, residential treatment facility, and/or hospitalization, parent training, parent/child training 2) primary symptoms to be addressed include callous-unemotional traits (CE), reciprocal relations, limited prosocial emotion (LPE), emotional dysfunction, emotional self-regulation, executive function (inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and working memory.) The counselor provided a definition and understanding for each symptom and specific psychosocial treatment. The treatment was to focus on emotions and self-management that cut across several of the symptoms. A counselor concern is to develop a working alliance since the client appears resistant to counseling and symptoms reflect a lack of trust.

Question 3

Domain 2. Intake, Assessment, and Diagnosis

Sub-Domain 2.Q. Obtain client self-reports

  • 3. Information shared by the client during intake that his mother lacked warmth and was detached and his father was mean and harsh would suggest a lack of development regarding:
Next Question


Part One

Intake


Clint

Age:  12

Sex:  Male

Gender:  Male

Sexuality:  

Ethnicity:  Caucasian

Relationship Status:  Single

Counseling Setting:  Outpatient – community counseling office

Types of Counseling:  Individual and Family

Presenting Problem:  Aggressive, lack of remorse, impulsivity, anger, noncompliant

Diagnosis:  Conduct Disorder, childhood-onset type, callous-lack of empathy

  

Presenting Problem:

The client was accompanied by his mother to the counseling office after an incident surrounding a neighbor's complaint. She expressed frustrations and stated up front that she had lost control in how to raise her son. He needs a reality check in how to get along with people. He is unable to develop and maintain a prosocial relationship with his peers and is much like his father. The mother was hesitant in correcting the client when he did not express any type of greeting when meeting the counselor. He immediately took a seat directly in front of the therapist and took out his cell phone. She presented with a degree of helplessness and ineptness in managing and raising her son. The extenuating circumstances for this appointment was she believed he acted out again; this time driving their golf cart across a neighbor's front lawn and tearing up the sod. The neighbor called the police to report the incident and shortly thereafter the police appeared at the client's door. The client was present when the officer reported the disturbance and asked him if did the act. He denied doing so and blamed teenagers.

Mental Status:

The client is of average intelligence, communication was minimal and rather abrupt. His first statement to the interviewer was that he did not have answers for the policeman's insinuations. He added to this statement indicating his mother has all the answers. He appears to have a maturity gap which is likely to be a result of an extended period of dependence (unsubstantiated). When asked about his family, he said his father was often mean, harsh, and his mother seemed like she lacked warmth and was detached from his world. When his mother was sharing her observations about the purpose of the counseling appointment, he interrupted her with, "You don't know the facts, it was not like that and come on, you are making it worse than it really was." The mother appeared embarrassed and said, "That is how he is with everyone." When these interchanges took place, the interviewer asked the client to let his mother finish and it would be his turn to relate his thoughts. The client's reply was in a style of argumentative stance. He said, "If you are making the decisions, it is important that you know the facts." He presents with signs of a lack of inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and emotional dysregulation.

Family History:

The mother said there was turmoil in the family for most of the years before the divorce three years ago. Her son seemed to be affected more than she or his sister. He seemed to blame her for the divorce yet his father was mentally and physically mean to him. She feels responsible because she was not a good mother. When he was born she went through a bad time knowing she was not ready for a child. She is aware she was not there for him in the early years and did not model good parentification skills. She worked through that period and the bad times with her husband but dearly wants the best for her son, she does love him. The father was a distant person who had difficulty revealing his feelings other than irritability and a strong need for control. While married, she did not intervene in family discipline because her husband was the master of the house and belittled any efforts of hers to contribute. The divorce prompted her to find full-time employment. Both children were pretty much latch-key children because of her work responsibilities. She was reported to the county agency and visited by a social worker to respond to the charge of 'children unattended'. She was aware of her son's increasing social and maybe legal inappropriateness. When the golf cart incident was brought to her attention, her son did not admit to being responsible. When the officer left, she began to cry and raised her voice and said, "How could you?" The son turned his back and retreated to his room without a response. He has cut classes at school and things have been missing from the home. He will leave the house in the evening and often does not meet a set curfew. At times, when he has not met her curfew, she has not held him responsible for his actions. They have had arguments and shoving episodes although he has not hit her. He tussles and has gotten physical with his sister but nothing hurtful except for feelings. He likes to be the tough guy in the neighborhood which has ended in a couple of fist-fights. She cares about him and wants him on the right track.

Counselor deliberations prior to first session:

The primary symptoms to be managed and treated were addressed prior to and during the first session including: 1) counseling setting for individual, residential treatment facility, and/or hospitalization, parent training, parent/child training 2) primary symptoms to be addressed include callous-unemotional traits (CE), reciprocal relations, limited prosocial emotion (LPE), emotional dysfunction, emotional self-regulation, executive function (inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and working memory.) The counselor provided a definition and understanding for each symptom and specific psychosocial treatment. The treatment was to focus on emotions and self-management that cut across several of the symptoms. A counselor concern is to develop a working alliance since the client appears resistant to counseling and symptoms reflect a lack of trust.

Question 4

Domain 2. Intake, Assessment, and Diagnosis

Sub-Domain 2.F. Perform a Mental Status Exam (MSE)

  • 4. Symptoms at intake indicated the client was assessed with callous-unemotional trait. A precondition for treatment planning (change) and communicating with the client, what treatment barrier would be foremost in the mind of the counselor?
Next Question


Part One

Intake


Clint

Age:  12

Sex:  Male

Gender:  Male

Sexuality:  

Ethnicity:  Caucasian

Relationship Status:  Single

Counseling Setting:  Outpatient – community counseling office

Types of Counseling:  Individual and Family

Presenting Problem:  Aggressive, lack of remorse, impulsivity, anger, noncompliant

Diagnosis:  Conduct Disorder, childhood-onset type, callous-lack of empathy

  

Presenting Problem:

The client was accompanied by his mother to the counseling office after an incident surrounding a neighbor's complaint. She expressed frustrations and stated up front that she had lost control in how to raise her son. He needs a reality check in how to get along with people. He is unable to develop and maintain a prosocial relationship with his peers and is much like his father. The mother was hesitant in correcting the client when he did not express any type of greeting when meeting the counselor. He immediately took a seat directly in front of the therapist and took out his cell phone. She presented with a degree of helplessness and ineptness in managing and raising her son. The extenuating circumstances for this appointment was she believed he acted out again; this time driving their golf cart across a neighbor's front lawn and tearing up the sod. The neighbor called the police to report the incident and shortly thereafter the police appeared at the client's door. The client was present when the officer reported the disturbance and asked him if did the act. He denied doing so and blamed teenagers.

Mental Status:

The client is of average intelligence, communication was minimal and rather abrupt. His first statement to the interviewer was that he did not have answers for the policeman's insinuations. He added to this statement indicating his mother has all the answers. He appears to have a maturity gap which is likely to be a result of an extended period of dependence (unsubstantiated). When asked about his family, he said his father was often mean, harsh, and his mother seemed like she lacked warmth and was detached from his world. When his mother was sharing her observations about the purpose of the counseling appointment, he interrupted her with, "You don't know the facts, it was not like that and come on, you are making it worse than it really was." The mother appeared embarrassed and said, "That is how he is with everyone." When these interchanges took place, the interviewer asked the client to let his mother finish and it would be his turn to relate his thoughts. The client's reply was in a style of argumentative stance. He said, "If you are making the decisions, it is important that you know the facts." He presents with signs of a lack of inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and emotional dysregulation.

Family History:

The mother said there was turmoil in the family for most of the years before the divorce three years ago. Her son seemed to be affected more than she or his sister. He seemed to blame her for the divorce yet his father was mentally and physically mean to him. She feels responsible because she was not a good mother. When he was born she went through a bad time knowing she was not ready for a child. She is aware she was not there for him in the early years and did not model good parentification skills. She worked through that period and the bad times with her husband but dearly wants the best for her son, she does love him. The father was a distant person who had difficulty revealing his feelings other than irritability and a strong need for control. While married, she did not intervene in family discipline because her husband was the master of the house and belittled any efforts of hers to contribute. The divorce prompted her to find full-time employment. Both children were pretty much latch-key children because of her work responsibilities. She was reported to the county agency and visited by a social worker to respond to the charge of 'children unattended'. She was aware of her son's increasing social and maybe legal inappropriateness. When the golf cart incident was brought to her attention, her son did not admit to being responsible. When the officer left, she began to cry and raised her voice and said, "How could you?" The son turned his back and retreated to his room without a response. He has cut classes at school and things have been missing from the home. He will leave the house in the evening and often does not meet a set curfew. At times, when he has not met her curfew, she has not held him responsible for his actions. They have had arguments and shoving episodes although he has not hit her. He tussles and has gotten physical with his sister but nothing hurtful except for feelings. He likes to be the tough guy in the neighborhood which has ended in a couple of fist-fights. She cares about him and wants him on the right track.

Counselor deliberations prior to first session:

The primary symptoms to be managed and treated were addressed prior to and during the first session including: 1) counseling setting for individual, residential treatment facility, and/or hospitalization, parent training, parent/child training 2) primary symptoms to be addressed include callous-unemotional traits (CE), reciprocal relations, limited prosocial emotion (LPE), emotional dysfunction, emotional self-regulation, executive function (inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and working memory.) The counselor provided a definition and understanding for each symptom and specific psychosocial treatment. The treatment was to focus on emotions and self-management that cut across several of the symptoms. A counselor concern is to develop a working alliance since the client appears resistant to counseling and symptoms reflect a lack of trust.

Question 5

Domain 2. Intake, Assessment, and Diagnosis

Sub-Domain 2.J. Assess the presenting problem and level of distress

  • 5. A precondition for genetic association is associated with what client behavior?
Next Question


Part One

Intake


Clint

Age:  12

Sex:  Male

Gender:  Male

Sexuality:  

Ethnicity:  Caucasian

Relationship Status:  Single

Counseling Setting:  Outpatient – community counseling office

Types of Counseling:  Individual and Family

Presenting Problem:  Aggressive, lack of remorse, impulsivity, anger, noncompliant

Diagnosis:  Conduct Disorder, childhood-onset type, callous-lack of empathy

  

Presenting Problem:

The client was accompanied by his mother to the counseling office after an incident surrounding a neighbor's complaint. She expressed frustrations and stated up front that she had lost control in how to raise her son. He needs a reality check in how to get along with people. He is unable to develop and maintain a prosocial relationship with his peers and is much like his father. The mother was hesitant in correcting the client when he did not express any type of greeting when meeting the counselor. He immediately took a seat directly in front of the therapist and took out his cell phone. She presented with a degree of helplessness and ineptness in managing and raising her son. The extenuating circumstances for this appointment was she believed he acted out again; this time driving their golf cart across a neighbor's front lawn and tearing up the sod. The neighbor called the police to report the incident and shortly thereafter the police appeared at the client's door. The client was present when the officer reported the disturbance and asked him if did the act. He denied doing so and blamed teenagers.

Mental Status:

The client is of average intelligence, communication was minimal and rather abrupt. His first statement to the interviewer was that he did not have answers for the policeman's insinuations. He added to this statement indicating his mother has all the answers. He appears to have a maturity gap which is likely to be a result of an extended period of dependence (unsubstantiated). When asked about his family, he said his father was often mean, harsh, and his mother seemed like she lacked warmth and was detached from his world. When his mother was sharing her observations about the purpose of the counseling appointment, he interrupted her with, "You don't know the facts, it was not like that and come on, you are making it worse than it really was." The mother appeared embarrassed and said, "That is how he is with everyone." When these interchanges took place, the interviewer asked the client to let his mother finish and it would be his turn to relate his thoughts. The client's reply was in a style of argumentative stance. He said, "If you are making the decisions, it is important that you know the facts." He presents with signs of a lack of inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and emotional dysregulation.

Family History:

The mother said there was turmoil in the family for most of the years before the divorce three years ago. Her son seemed to be affected more than she or his sister. He seemed to blame her for the divorce yet his father was mentally and physically mean to him. She feels responsible because she was not a good mother. When he was born she went through a bad time knowing she was not ready for a child. She is aware she was not there for him in the early years and did not model good parentification skills. She worked through that period and the bad times with her husband but dearly wants the best for her son, she does love him. The father was a distant person who had difficulty revealing his feelings other than irritability and a strong need for control. While married, she did not intervene in family discipline because her husband was the master of the house and belittled any efforts of hers to contribute. The divorce prompted her to find full-time employment. Both children were pretty much latch-key children because of her work responsibilities. She was reported to the county agency and visited by a social worker to respond to the charge of 'children unattended'. She was aware of her son's increasing social and maybe legal inappropriateness. When the golf cart incident was brought to her attention, her son did not admit to being responsible. When the officer left, she began to cry and raised her voice and said, "How could you?" The son turned his back and retreated to his room without a response. He has cut classes at school and things have been missing from the home. He will leave the house in the evening and often does not meet a set curfew. At times, when he has not met her curfew, she has not held him responsible for his actions. They have had arguments and shoving episodes although he has not hit her. He tussles and has gotten physical with his sister but nothing hurtful except for feelings. He likes to be the tough guy in the neighborhood which has ended in a couple of fist-fights. She cares about him and wants him on the right track.

Counselor deliberations prior to first session:

The primary symptoms to be managed and treated were addressed prior to and during the first session including: 1) counseling setting for individual, residential treatment facility, and/or hospitalization, parent training, parent/child training 2) primary symptoms to be addressed include callous-unemotional traits (CE), reciprocal relations, limited prosocial emotion (LPE), emotional dysfunction, emotional self-regulation, executive function (inhibitory control, cognitive shifting, and working memory.) The counselor provided a definition and understanding for each symptom and specific psychosocial treatment. The treatment was to focus on emotions and self-management that cut across several of the symptoms. A counselor concern is to develop a working alliance since the client appears resistant to counseling and symptoms reflect a lack of trust.

Question 6

Domain 1. Professional Practice and Ethics

Sub-Domain 1.T. Provide referral sources if counseling services are inadequate/inappropriate

  • 6. What might be a recommended intervention for the client and mother to support the counselor's explanation of the intake information and possible counseling recommendations (setting)?
Next Question


Part Two

First session, one week after the initial intake:

The counselor met briefly with the mother and client to share the treatment plan. The counselor recommended that the client's mother consider four possible treatment recommendations in the order of importance and for best client care. The first recommendation was a referral to a residential treatment facility for her son because of the severity of the disorder and symptoms. A second recommendation was for her to consider parent training. Parent/child therapy was the third recommendation. The final recommendation was individual therapy for her son. The mother said she did not have the finances to do any of the counseling options but her son needed help. She would find a way to pay for his individual therapy at this center. The individual therapy with the client was to be 10-weekly sessions to develop skills in line with the disorder symptoms. The client told his mother he was not going to do the individual counseling. He said, "I am not guilty of any misbehavior, everyone claims I am a walking guilty wagon of trouble." The remainder of the first session was the counselor's effort to increase the client's motivation for his involvement in the therapy. He has considered the need to inform the client of the importance of limit setting, commitment for change, and compliance. Setting limits was emphasized to utilize the counseling time together, establish an equal working relationship, to accomplish the agreed upon priority goals, and to explain the purpose of the treatment modality. The client listened without interrupting, made limited eye contact often shifting his eyes to some item elsewhere in the room and, at times, nodded approval and during a pause said he would have to give it some thought. The counselor's final statement was an attempt to solicit the client's commitment to provide feedback at the beginning of each session. The client did not react to this final request.

Question 7

Domain 4. Treatment Planning

Sub-Domain 4.G. Guide treatment planning

  • 7. A precondition for treatment planning is treatment engagement (TE). If change is the expected outcome for therapy, what conditions are early considerations?
Next Question


Part Two

First session, one week after the initial intake:

The counselor met briefly with the mother and client to share the treatment plan. The counselor recommended that the client's mother consider four possible treatment recommendations in the order of importance and for best client care. The first recommendation was a referral to a residential treatment facility for her son because of the severity of the disorder and symptoms. A second recommendation was for her to consider parent training. Parent/child therapy was the third recommendation. The final recommendation was individual therapy for her son. The mother said she did not have the finances to do any of the counseling options but her son needed help. She would find a way to pay for his individual therapy at this center. The individual therapy with the client was to be 10-weekly sessions to develop skills in line with the disorder symptoms. The client told his mother he was not going to do the individual counseling. He said, "I am not guilty of any misbehavior, everyone claims I am a walking guilty wagon of trouble." The remainder of the first session was the counselor's effort to increase the client's motivation for his involvement in the therapy. He has considered the need to inform the client of the importance of limit setting, commitment for change, and compliance. Setting limits was emphasized to utilize the counseling time together, establish an equal working relationship, to accomplish the agreed upon priority goals, and to explain the purpose of the treatment modality. The client listened without interrupting, made limited eye contact often shifting his eyes to some item elsewhere in the room and, at times, nodded approval and during a pause said he would have to give it some thought. The counselor's final statement was an attempt to solicit the client's commitment to provide feedback at the beginning of each session. The client did not react to this final request.

Question 8

Domain 4. Treatment Planning

Sub-Domain 4.G. Guide treatment planning

  • 8. Using the intake information, the counselor listed the following symptoms; prosocial emotions, reciprocal relations, emotional dysfunctions, and deficits in executive functioning. These four goals would be targets for different therapy sessions. Which symptom would involve all four criteria categories (aggression, destruction, deceitfulness, and violation of rules) and be a priority to begin the initial session of therapy?
Next Question


Part Two

First session, one week after the initial intake:

The counselor met briefly with the mother and client to share the treatment plan. The counselor recommended that the client's mother consider four possible treatment recommendations in the order of importance and for best client care. The first recommendation was a referral to a residential treatment facility for her son because of the severity of the disorder and symptoms. A second recommendation was for her to consider parent training. Parent/child therapy was the third recommendation. The final recommendation was individual therapy for her son. The mother said she did not have the finances to do any of the counseling options but her son needed help. She would find a way to pay for his individual therapy at this center. The individual therapy with the client was to be 10-weekly sessions to develop skills in line with the disorder symptoms. The client told his mother he was not going to do the individual counseling. He said, "I am not guilty of any misbehavior, everyone claims I am a walking guilty wagon of trouble." The remainder of the first session was the counselor's effort to increase the client's motivation for his involvement in the therapy. He has considered the need to inform the client of the importance of limit setting, commitment for change, and compliance. Setting limits was emphasized to utilize the counseling time together, establish an equal working relationship, to accomplish the agreed upon priority goals, and to explain the purpose of the treatment modality. The client listened without interrupting, made limited eye contact often shifting his eyes to some item elsewhere in the room and, at times, nodded approval and during a pause said he would have to give it some thought. The counselor's final statement was an attempt to solicit the client's commitment to provide feedback at the beginning of each session. The client did not react to this final request.

Question 9

Domain 4. Treatment Planning

Sub-Domain 4.C. Identify barriers affecting client goal attainment

  • 9. The goal for session one was limited prosocial emotions (LPE). The client meets three of the LPE domains. The four domains are lack of remorse/guilt, callous-lack of empathy, unconcerned about their performance, and shallow or deficient affect. The counselor believes the four domains are separate but related. Which domain of the three does the client meet and would be given treatment priority?
Next Question


Part Two

First session, one week after the initial intake:

The counselor met briefly with the mother and client to share the treatment plan. The counselor recommended that the client's mother consider four possible treatment recommendations in the order of importance and for best client care. The first recommendation was a referral to a residential treatment facility for her son because of the severity of the disorder and symptoms. A second recommendation was for her to consider parent training. Parent/child therapy was the third recommendation. The final recommendation was individual therapy for her son. The mother said she did not have the finances to do any of the counseling options but her son needed help. She would find a way to pay for his individual therapy at this center. The individual therapy with the client was to be 10-weekly sessions to develop skills in line with the disorder symptoms. The client told his mother he was not going to do the individual counseling. He said, "I am not guilty of any misbehavior, everyone claims I am a walking guilty wagon of trouble." The remainder of the first session was the counselor's effort to increase the client's motivation for his involvement in the therapy. He has considered the need to inform the client of the importance of limit setting, commitment for change, and compliance. Setting limits was emphasized to utilize the counseling time together, establish an equal working relationship, to accomplish the agreed upon priority goals, and to explain the purpose of the treatment modality. The client listened without interrupting, made limited eye contact often shifting his eyes to some item elsewhere in the room and, at times, nodded approval and during a pause said he would have to give it some thought. The counselor's final statement was an attempt to solicit the client's commitment to provide feedback at the beginning of each session. The client did not react to this final request.

Question 10

Domain 6. Core Counseling Attributes

Sub-Domain 6.A. Awareness of self and impact on clients

  • 10. During the first therapy session the client looked at the counselor, shifted his eyes to objects in the room, appeared to listen attentively and nodded at appropriate times in the form of approval. When sharing the idea of individual therapy with the client and mother, the client used shifting eye contact and head nod as non-verbal communication. How might the counselor receive some feedback from his observations?
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Part Three

Session two, one week after session one:

The counselor praised the client for sharing communication that took place during the past week with his mother. They had a conversation about school issues and why he did not comply to the home curfew. The client told his mother he did not want to communicate with his father. He said, "He is a hard man, does not care about me and I do not care what he thinks of me. You have to be tough to survive in his world." He started to self-disclose about the treatment he received by his father and stopped short but did tell his mother, with agitation in his voice, what he blames on me, those are his problems, not mine."

Question 11

Domain 2. Intake, Assessment, and Diagnosis

Sub-Domain 2.J. Assess the presenting problem and level of distress

  • 11. The client has a history of maltreatment (mental/physical) and motherly qualities lacked caring warmth. What symptom will mediate maltreatment and externalizing problems?
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Part Three

Session two, one week after session one:

The counselor praised the client for sharing communication that took place during the past week with his mother. They had a conversation about school issues and why he did not comply to the home curfew. The client told his mother he did not want to communicate with his father. He said, "He is a hard man, does not care about me and I do not care what he thinks of me. You have to be tough to survive in his world." He started to self-disclose about the treatment he received by his father and stopped short but did tell his mother, with agitation in his voice, what he blames on me, those are his problems, not mine."

Question 12

Domain 4. Treatment Planning

Sub-Domain 4.B. Establish short- and long-term counseling goals consistent with client’s diagnosis

  • 12. The client said he recognized his impulsive acting out needs to stop. He said, "It is difficult to stop, I can't seem to stop once I start and I do things that end up hurting me. When all is done, I end up thinking, was it worth it." What behavioral term was the client referencing a lack of?
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Part Three

Session two, one week after session one:

The counselor praised the client for sharing communication that took place during the past week with his mother. They had a conversation about school issues and why he did not comply to the home curfew. The client told his mother he did not want to communicate with his father. He said, "He is a hard man, does not care about me and I do not care what he thinks of me. You have to be tough to survive in his world." He started to self-disclose about the treatment he received by his father and stopped short but did tell his mother, with agitation in his voice, what he blames on me, those are his problems, not mine."

Question 13

Domain 5. Counseling Skills and Interventions

Sub-Domain 5.F. Apply theory-based counseling intervention(s)

  • 13. Building on the client's self-disclosure and to some degree of self-awareness of his actions, what intervention would provide a deeper understanding of his actions and support his self-disclosure and possible engagement as a change in his thinking?



Part Three

Session two, one week after session one:

The counselor praised the client for sharing communication that took place during the past week with his mother. They had a conversation about school issues and why he did not comply to the home curfew. The client told his mother he did not want to communicate with his father. He said, "He is a hard man, does not care about me and I do not care what he thinks of me. You have to be tough to survive in his world." He started to self-disclose about the treatment he received by his father and stopped short but did tell his mother, with agitation in his voice, what he blames on me, those are his problems, not mine."